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Archive for the ‘Miscellany’ Category

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If you haven’t already read Dave Ramsey’s Complete Guide to Money, check it out! The hardcover book is discounted, and the  Kindle version for only $9.99!

Dave Ramsey didn’t invent these fancy envelopes, of course. The ones we got from him were boring. I got the envelope template here and the idea for a cover here .

I made a lot of changes in the cover, but the envelopes are pretty much as written in the directions. I didn’t have two-sided scrapbooking paper, so I cut 12″ sheets of 1-sided paper down to 8 1/2″ x 11″ and then printed digital scrapbooking sheets (try pinterest for freebies!) on the back side.

First, I made a practice envelope.

When I was sure I had it right, I made 8 of them and then bound them as shown in the second link, with grosgrain ribbon in the stitching. I made a cardboard cover and covered the outside of that with scrapbook paper. The flap is pink because the 12″ paper was really too small to cover the cardboard piece well. (the cardboard piece was 12″ to start with).

I should have added a strip of decorative paper down the center of the inside spine before I glued the ribbons down. The bare cardboard is visible when the book is open.

I faced it with another piece of paper, to over the ribbons. I can’t bring the paper all the way into the center to cover the exposed cardboard because of the crease. It won’t stay there.

The back

stick-on velcro closure


Oh – I need to put labels on the flaps of each envelope! It’s too late now… I think I will do that tomorrow! 🙂

If you decide to make this, I recommend cutting the envelopes from the pdf version of the file. THEN, do the sewing before you glue the envelopes into “envelopes”. It’s important! Take my word for it.

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fpu

If you haven’t already read Dave Ramsey’s Complete Guide to Money, check it out! The hardcover book is discounted, and the Kindle version for only $9.99!

Dave Ramsey didn’t invent these fancy envelopes, of course. The ones we got from him were boring. I got the envelope template here and the idea for a cover here .

I made a lot of changes in the cover, but the envelopes are pretty much as written in the directions. I didn’t have two-sided scrapbooking paper, so I cut 12″ sheets of 1-sided paper down to 8 1/2″ x 11″ and then printed digital scrapbooking sheets (try pinterest for freebies!) on the back side.

First, I made a practice envelope.

When I was sure I had it right, I made 8 of them and then bound them as shown in the second link, with grosgrain ribbon in the stitching. I made a cardboard cover and covered the outside of that with scrapbook paper. The flap is pink because the 12″ paper was really too small to cover the cardboard piece well. (the cardboard piece was 12″ to start with).

I should have added a strip of decorative paper down the center of the inside spine before I glued the ribbons down. The bare cardboard is visible when the book is open.

I faced it with another piece of paper, to over the ribbons. I can’t bring the paper all the way into the center to cover the exposed cardboard because of the crease. It won’t stay there.

The back

stick-on velcro closure


Oh – I need to put labels on the flaps of each envelope! It’s too late now… I think I will do that tomorrow! 🙂

If you decide to make this, I recommend cutting the envelopes from the pdf version of the file. THEN, do the sewing before you glue the envelopes into “envelopes”. It’s important! Take my word for it.

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College Con’t

Guys do not wear bathrobes. I checked with some male college students. They wear gym shorts and a tshirt. Or towels.

We are starting to set aside some of the toiletries. We have so many bottles of free shampoo, bars of soap, tubes of toothpaste and toothbrushes, deodorant… so it’s mostly clothing and household items he will need.

School supplies! As homeschoolers, we just didn’t do a lot of  “school supplies” shopping. And, of course, we don’t really know what he will need.  Notebooks and pens to start with, I suppose. I’d better track down those experienced college students again and ask more questions.

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College Bound

For a taxpayer-funded institution, the state university is sure expensive! I know private colleges are higher, but DH’s private college has many scholarships and discounts, so his education is actually cheaper than it will be for DS#3 to attend the public school.

Every time we turn around, there is another letter or email wanting us to mail them $100 by yesterday.  We found some lists of what Matthew will need for dorm life. One list is four pages long!  He won’t need all of the items, of course, and we have some of it here at home.  Something we hadn’t considered is a cell phone. There is cable television in every room, but there are no landline telephones!  We’ve never used cell phones, and we are not going to take on an unnecessary monthly bill, so we bought a prepaid tracfone. We got a very good deal on it! Matthew will have to buy his own refill minutes, but he has a phone to start with.

I have been worried about sheets. Dorm beds are XL twins, which are hard to find except in the back-to-school sales. They go on sale at Kmart tomorrow! In addition, I have been offered a brand new set by a friend who couldn’t use hers. Towels. A Bathrobe. My son has never worn a bathrobe in his life. Do guys really wear bathrobes in the dorms? Oh, and there are beds, but they really want you to rent loft kits so you can put a desk in your room.  Loft kits – $80

The list goes on and on. We should have had all of this taken care of months ago, but we didn’t. It’s amazing how many little and big expenses there are!

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I am soliciting ideas! Just the two of us, in the United States. My husband doesn’t want to go anywhere hot, unless it’s a beach. I would rather have two weeks of a frugal vacation than 5 days of a more posh vacation, and I would like to have a mildly adventurous vacation – hiking, caving, parasailing, snorkeling… something that we don’t normally have the opportunity to do.

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In yesterday’s mail – free sunscreen sample, just in case summer ever arrives in Wisconsin.

Do you ever “make over” your clothes? It’s an old-fashioned idea and brings to mind the image of the collars on men’s shirts.  I’m a fairly good dressmaker, so when I make my own clothes, they usually fit me.  But everyone has at least some store-bought items. 😉  I am guilty of hanging on to clothes for a long time, even when they don’t fit. I am not talking about losing or gaining weight (well, not entirely), but about “shape.”  I am long-waisted, but I do have a waist. Most store-bought clothes have waistlines that hit me 3/4″ – 1″ too high. It’s a bigger deal than you might think.  The fullness below the waist – where it flares preparatory for hitting the hips – is over my waist and tummy instead of my hips. It’s not flattering. 

Lately, I don’t put up with it. Since I don’t like the way they fit, I don’t wear them. But since they are pretty and they do actually go over my head and I don’t have many clothes, I don’t throw them out. Recently, I restructured two rayon summer dresses. The first one had six rows of shirring in the back. I removed the top two rows of elastic thread and added two at the bottom. VOILA! Instant fit!  The other dress had fisheye darts, and I simply turned it inside out and extended the fullest part of the darts downward about 1″ and then lengthened the bottom end of the darts 1″. 

I bought a pair of very nice knit pants, and they just didn’t fit at the waist. I realized that they weren’t intended to sit at the natural waist, but I was constantly hitching them up as they slid down my fanny. Since there was room in the crotch length, I opened the back waistband and replaced the elastic with a smaller piece.  I also stitched down the bulky faux placket in the flat front and removed the decorative button there, since they always showed (poked out) through the shirt I wore over them. Now the pants fit nicely and look good with a smooth tshirt or sweater. They sit about 1 1/2″ below my natural waistline, and they stay there.

I like bateau necklines, but often they are cut too high. I cut them lower and use a plain rolled hem to finish them. It generally looks just fine.  Gaping armholes or those that bind at the arm can be tightened or cut away.  Pants can be cut into capris or shorts. Slim the legs or cut a little notch at the bottom side as necessary.  Mending and basic alterations in width or length are easy fixes, of course.  Holes caused by pulling buttons can be fixed by reinforcing the underside of the placket with a scrap of fabric. Any stitching will be covered by the button. Stretched-out buttonholes can be tightened up with a few whip stitches at one end. Immodest slits in a skirts, or openings at the bottom of a button-front dress, can be sewed up. Pin them carefully if they are rayon or knit, matching the ends at the hem and preventing stretching while you sew.

Patching jeans is easy if you slit the inner leg (or whichever doesn’t have a flat-felled seam) and do your patching on the flat leg.  Then restitch the seam. I don’t usually open it all the way down to the hem, since I don’t want to have to redo that.  Gray thread usually works best for jeans. Place your patch (a piece of denim from old, cast-off jeans) underneath, pin it in place and stitch it on top. Trim away any frayed threads.

And you know… it’s perfectly legal to remove tags once you own the item. It’s best to pick out the stitches if possible instead of cutting them off.

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1 Kings 17:2-16

…The word of the LORD came to Elijah:  “Leave here, turn eastward and hide in the Kerith Ravine, east of the Jordan.  You will drink from the brook, and I have ordered the ravens to feed you there.”  So he did what the LORD had told him. He went to the Kerith Ravine, east of the Jordan, and stayed there.  The ravens brought him bread and meat in the morning and bread and meat in the evening, and he drank from the brook.  Some time later the brook dried up because there had been no rain in the land.   Then the word of the LORD came to him:   “Go at once to Zarephath of Sidon and stay there. I have commanded a widow in that place to supply you with food.”   So he went to Zarephath. When he came to the town gate, a widow was there gathering sticks. He called to her and asked, “Would you bring me a little water in a jar so I may have a drink?”  As she was going to get it, he called, “And bring me, please, a piece of bread.”   “As surely as the LORD your God lives,” she replied, “I don’t have any bread—only a handful of flour in a jar and a little oil in a jug. I am gathering a few sticks to take home and make a meal for myself and my son, that we may eat it—and die.”   Elijah said to her, “Don’t be afraid. Go home and do as you have said. But first make a small cake of bread for me from what you have and bring it to me, and then make something for yourself and your son.   For this is what the LORD, the God of Israel, says: ‘The jar of flour will not be used up and the jug of oil will not run dry until the day the LORD gives rain on the land.’ ”   She went away and did as Elijah had told her. So there was food every day for Elijah and for the woman and her family.  For the jar of flour was not used up and the jug of oil did not run dry, in keeping with the word of the LORD spoken by Elijah.

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